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In the symmetric choreography both partners host a server and both are able to initiate the communication. This option greatly reduces the number of messages that are needed to perform the same actions and places more control in the hands of both partners.

Symmetric Web Service Calls

Basic Level

 

Full Level

 

 

Call

Receive

Call

Receive

DeliveryFrequencyChangeRequestCall

 

 

RedeliveryRequestCall

 

 

ReleaseAvailabilityRequestCall

 

 

ReleaseAvailabilityCall

 

 

SupplyChainStatusCall

 

 

ReleaseSupplyChainStatusRequestCall

 

 

OrderedReleasesInQueueRequestCall

 

 

 

ReportRequestCall

 

 

 

ReportDeliveryCall

 

 

 

InformationAboutAvailableReleaseRequestCall

 

 

 

ReleaseStatusInformationCall

 

 

 

ReleaseStatusRequestCall

 

 

 


Also the variety of calls that can be made is bigger.



Figure 3: Lifecycle of a Release using symmetric WebService calls

Instead of waiting for a report to be delivered after using the OrderedReleaseInQueue–RequestMessage (7), the partner can be informed immediately after the report is generated, using the ReportDeliveryMessage (6).

As soon as a new release is available for a partner the ReleaseAvailabilityMessage (1) is used to inform. Requesting releases in a specific order is possible. This can be used if there are high priority products, which the partner would like to receive prior to others, for example. In the asymmetric case, there is no way for the provider of releases to request the status of a release in the recipient's supply chain in an automated way. The content provider can only wait until the SupplyChainStatusMessage arrives from the content recipient. In the symmetric choreography the ReleaseSupplyChainStatusRequestMessage(4) allows to actively requests the status of the product in the recipient's supply chain. Again, there are a many more messages and for a detailed description and the full list of messages available please refer to the Release Delivery Choreography Standard.

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2 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    Hi, the text in Figure 3 is not readable, the resolution is too low. Is that possible to fix?

  2. Yes, that diagram was bad. I have updated it.