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No.

The ISRC is a unique identification system for sound recordings. Sound Recordings are not Releases. Formally, DDEX defines a Release as:

An abstract entity representing a bundle of one or more Resources compiled by an issuer for the purpose of distribution to individual Consumers, directly or through intermediaries. The Resources in Releases are normally primarily SoundRecordings or music audio-visual recordings. The Release is not itself the item of trade (or Product). Products have more extensive attributes than Releases; one Release may be disseminated in many different Products.

In less structured language, Releases are the collection of Sound Recordings and/or other Resources that can then be productised and made available to consumers under specific terms and conditions (a.k.a. Deals).

So for this reason, ISRC codes are never suitable identifiers for any release types which incorporate several resources, audio, video, images, or text. For example a Single track audio single, contains two resources, only one sound recording but also a cover art image. The same applies to a ringtone, one sound recording but also one cover art image. For all those releases, the main release identifier has to be either a UPC, or a Global Release Identifiers (GRIDs). These can be augmented by a proprietary Identifier, such a catalogue number for example but the UPC or the GRID are the only primary release identifiers permitted.

This rule has two exceptions: Track Releases and Single-Resource Releases.

Track Releases

They are Releases that contain only one sound recording or video which form parts of the main (parent) Release. 

For example, when communicating a 10-track album, a typical NewReleaseMessage would contain, besides the Main Release, ten Track Releases (i.e. one for each sound recording that together make up the album), so altogether there would be eleven Releases.

The track releases also need to have an unique identifier each. This can be a UPC or a GRID can be used, or alternatively a Proprietary identifiers. One such Proprietary Identifier used to identify Track Releases is a concatenation of the main Release's identifier and the ISRC of the Sound Recording that is contained in that Track Release.

For example:

<TrackRelease>
	<ReleaseReference>R1</ReleaseReference>
	<ReleaseId>
		<ProprietaryId Namespace="PADPIDA2013042401U">00094631432057_JPTO09404900</ProprietaryId>
	</ReleaseId>
	<!-- ... -->
<TrackRelease>



The Single-Resource Releases

These Releases contain, as the name indicates, only one Resource. For example, one Sound Recording but unlike a Single Release, they have usually no cover art. [NR: I would add a footnote here acknowledginf that we do have a profile for Single-Resource Releases with cover art]
Typically, these Single-Resource Releases are used for fingerprinting purposes and not for direct commercialisation to consumers, which is why extra elements like cover art images for example are not seen as necessary.
Again, like the Track Releases, they need to be identified uniquely. For these Releases but UPCs are not the best fit. So GRIDs can be used or Proprietary Identifiers can be used.
As above, Proprietary IDs can be the concatenation of the main Release's identifier and the ISRC of the sound recording that is contained in that single resource release, although in that case, the main release is not included or even referenced in the rest of the message but at least it guarantees the uniqueness.


Another solution is to use the IRSC but only by making it a ProprietaryID.
This is the only case where it is possible to use the ISRC as long as it clearly set in the context of a ProprietatyID and not just a Release ID and also only in the case of the SingleResourceReleaseProfile
For example
Not correct:
<ReleaseList>
<Release>
<ReleaseId>GBAFL1600395</ReleaseId>
<ReleaseReference>R0</ReleaseReference>

Correct:
<ReleaseList>
<Release>
<ReleaseId>
<ProprietaryId Namespace="DPID:PADPIDA1234567">GBAFL1600395</ProprietaryId>
</ReleaseId>
<ReleaseReference>R0</ReleaseReference>

The ISRC is a unique identification system for sound recordings. Sound recordings are not Releases. Formally, DDEX defines a Release as:

An abstract entity representing a bundle of one or more Resources compiled by an issuer for the purpose of distribution to individual Consumers, directly or through intermediaries. The Resources in Releases are normally primarily SoundRecordings or music audio-visual recordings. The Release is not itself the item of trade (or Product). Products have more extensive attributes than Releases; one Release may be disseminated in many different Products.

In less structured language, Releases are the collection of sound recordings and/or other Resources that can then be productised and made available to consumers under specific terms and conditions (a.k.a. Deals). Some Releases may contain only one sound recording. Releases with just one sound recording come in two forms: TrackReleases and Single-Resource Releases.

Single-Resource Releases are the digital equivalents of what used to be a "single" in the physical world (although a single typically contained two sound recordings) whereas TrackReleases are Releases that contain one sound recording taken from an album. For example, when communicating a 10-track album, a typical NewReleaseMessage would contain, besides the Main Release, ten TrackReleases (i.e. one for each sound recording that together make up the album).

All Releases need to be identified; this applies to TrackReleases, Single-Resource Releases as well as "normal" Multi-Resource Releases. Typical identifiers for Releases are Global Release Identifiers (GRIDs), UPCs and, in some cases, Proprietary identifiers. One such proprietary identifier used to identify TrackReleases is a concatenation of the main Release's identifier and the ISRC of the sound recording that is contained in that TrackRelease.

However, Releases including Releases that only contain one Resource should not be identified by an ISRC as sound recordings simply aren't Releases.

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