RIN is a complex file format – it has to be, to be able to adequately document the salient aspects of a recording, mixing or mastering session. Yet, at the core RIN is also quite simple. It enables the storage and communication of who did what to, and with, what resource, where and when. The Resources referred to here can be creations such as musical works, recording components and sound recordings, but also equipment such as instruments or recording devices.

As a consequence, RIN files can be very small, providing very little information about only a few types of entities[1], as well as very large, providing lots of detailed data about many entities, and anything in-between. By way of note, the smallest RIN file that can be generated is shown below – but it is completely useless. It does include, however, one crucial aspect: information about the person who created the RIN file in the FileCreator tag.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<rin:RecordingInformationNotification xmlns:rin="http://ddex.net/xml/f-rin/11"
  xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
  xsi:schemaLocation="http://ddex.net/xml/f-rin/11 
  http://ddex.net/xml/rin/11/full-recording-information-notification.xsd"
  SchemaVersionId="rin/11" LanguageAndScriptCode="en">

  <FileHeader>
    <FileId>1</FileId>
   <FileCreatedDateTime>2019-06-18T12:23:00Z</FileCreatedDateTime>
   <SystemType>macOS</SystemType>
   <Version>10.14.5</Version>
    <FileCreator>
      <PartyId><ISNI>1234 1234 1234 1234</ISNI></PartyId>
   </FileCreator>
  </FileHeader>
</rin:RecordingInformationNotification>

 

This then begs the question about what a RIN file needs to contain in order to be useful. There is no single answer to this question:



[1] These can be creations such as musical works, recording components and sound recordings, but also equipment such as instruments, recording devices, etc.

[2] https://www.grammy.com/sites/com/files/pages/basiccreditslist.pdf